Fear NO Honey Bee - Page 2 of 3 - Organically managed gentle honey bees

Gentle genetics Honey Bee hive inspection

As this video will demonstrate.  These honey bee’s are very gentle.  My 10 year old daughter and I are doing inspections of the hives.  We are checking the queen’s and making sure they are laying a good pattern.  You will notice we are not wearing the typical jacket, veil or gloves in doing this.  Can you do this with your bee’s?  This makes bee keeping much more enjoyable when you don’t need to wear the extra clothing and you get all hot. We feel the genetics of these bee’s make it great to keep in an urban/suburban environment when you have kids or neighbors near by.  We raise the bee’s using organically manage practice.  Meaning, no toxic chemicals are used on the honey bee’s or their hives (they have enough environmental issues.) These honey bee’s are for sale from us.  We are in central Indiana (Indianapolis, IN) and offer 5 frame nuc, packages and queens for sale.  If you would like more information contact us 1-(317)-660-5355 or email...

Honey bee’s for sale Indianapolis IN

We are now selling honey bee’s.  Our bee’s are gentle enough that you can work them without a veil or jacket nor gloves, hence (FearNo honey bee).  This is perfect for backyard urban/suburban homes in central Indiana.  We do not put any chemicals on the bee’s and use natural chemical free wax that we harvest ourselves from our own bee’s. We are located in (Indy) Indianapolis, IN  We offer 5 frame Nuc (lang hive) bee’s and queens. All European bees before 1893 were raised in 4.9mm cells. After that year they were artificially enlarged to 5.4mm by A.I. Root and others. This bigger bee size worked for over 93 years, but has now become one of the problems that the bees face today. The thinking at that time was bigger bees, more honey. Studies have shown that the natural cell bees have 22% more cells per frame than the 5.4mm bees.  Our bee’s are the natural 4.9mm size Our breeder stock has proven to be survivors with a natural resistance to the Tracheal and Varroa mite. They must also be top quality brood and honey producers. One of the advantages of having such a variety of large genetic diversity is that studies have shown that they produce 30% more brood comb than a straight line genetic bee. Contact us today if you would like to purchase honey bee’s for your own...

First week with Don the Fat bee man

This was a quick video Jim and I did with Don the “Fat bee man”. We are commercial beekeepers student’s studying under Don. I learned a lot. Very easy to catch queens, put in attendants and they are ready to sell. These queens I brought back with me to run Fat Beeman genetics in my...

Prime Swarm from Warre´ hive

Thursday, I had a prime swarm from my main Warre´ hive.  This was a new hive from 2 – 3# (6#lbs/ 2.72K)  They also had a few “semi-frames” of comb and 2 frames of honey and 2 boxes.  This package was installed back on May 8, 2014 -> swarm happened June 26, 2014.   Here is how the story goes.  I took the puppy out to bathroom about 10:30 and heard the obvious sound of bee’s in the air.  Figured it must be a swarm.  I walked over to the hives, to see which hive might of swarmed (1 Warre´, 2 Langstroth)  I couldn’t tell, but indicators it was from the Warre´.  I’m walking around the backyard looking up in the tree’s trying to find the source of the sound.  I finally spotted flying around, >75’ (23m) and thought well it’s going to be impossible to get them.  I head back to the hives to try and check more (in the meantime calling my wife to come out)  As I get close to the hives, I see an abnormal amount of bee’s on the ground.  About to take a step and thought to myself that looks like a queen.  Sure enough the queen and about 5 direct attendants are walking on a piece of lumber.   From here things happen fast.  We scoop up the queen and 5 attendants.  I take and go over to my Warre´ bait hive.  I go to the front of it while my wife is at the rear looking in the windows.  I tilt the cage and let the queen and attendants walk in.  2 of the...

Honey I am harvesting the honey

With both of my bee hives dying, we had to process the honey.  With our hives being warre´ we cannot use the traditional method of harvesting honey that you may be familiar with.  For Lang hives, you harvest the box called a super.  Super’s have a number of frames in them, that you would take out.  You would use either a hot knife or a regular knife.  You then cut off all the cappings covering the honey, then you put these frames into a round machine called an extractor.  You then spin out all the honey from these frames, it hits the wall and falls down do a collection area, and now you have your honey.  This method is great if you force the bee’s to build the frames out to fit your way. In warre´ hive keeping.  You essentially let the bee’s build their honey comb any way that they wish.  Usually this is anything but straight to the human.  And thus harvesting can be different.  Here you use what is called “crush and strain”  It is essentially as it’s name implies.  You crush the honey comb and honey and all, then you strain it. Now to describe the process that we chose and some supplies that you will need. A couple of 5 gal buckets Something suitable as a strainer Something to crush Warm area Seems real complicated doesn’t it?  First one of your buckets you will drill holes into the bottom of it.  This will allow the honey to go through it.  Next you will need something to act as a strainer.  I chose to purchase...

Sad but Sweet

It is with sad news that I report to you that both hives have died (laymen’s terms).  Technically in bee keeping terminology it is called a “Dead Out”.  But regardless they are both gone.  We had suspicion back on December 20 that the “West” hive was dead as we put the candy board in to possibly supplement their honey if they ate it all during the winter.  Then back on January 13 a 50ºF day, we inspected the other hive in what our suspicion turned true that they too were dead. A friend of mine is going to put the bee’s under a microscope to make sure they did not die of a disease.  I don’t suspect that he will find anything.  Right now my suspicions is they died of “Freezing to death”.  In the winter bee’s will form a clump and huddle together.  Keeping each other warm, as well as the queen and any brood that are being developed.  They rotate out about 1/3 – 1/2 at a time, sleeping to warming the hive.  I suspect that on a warmer day, that they separated from the cluster, but then did not cluster back quickly enough as the temperature dropped and froze.  But honestly, we may never know. Here are the temperatures for our home from our weather station charted out for the Month(s). Where do we go from here?  Well, as part of the bee club I’m in, I have already ordered one set of bee’s.  They will be going into new Langstroth hives.  Then I’m hoping to either trap a swarm or get a call to go...

Some experimenting

Part of the reason I made my Modified Gatineau hive lift (aka Guillotine) from my previous http://localhost:8888/wordpress/gatineau-lift-what-is-that-you-say/  Was to be able to get in to the bee hives with minimal intrusion to the bee’s, as well as saving my back for years to come. On the experimenting side, I created some “Half” or semi frames, as well as full frames to be inserted.  There are a couple of reasons for these. First, we had a period of 11 days of rainy and cool weather, and this really slowed down the nectar flow and thus slowed down the girls.  I had added box 2 a month before, box 3, weeks ago and box 4, 1 week ago.  Boxes 3 and 4 were for anticipation of how fast they had been building and how many bee’s there were.  I expect box 3 to be started 3-4th week of June.  In reality they did not start building in it until about July 10 (just 2 days prior to the below video) Second, next year I wanted to have the ability to remove frames of food (honey and pollen) and/or open brood, to be able to do split’s and other things with.  I was planning on putting these in around mid/late August, but with the slowness of what I had recently been experiencing in building comb, I feared that may be too late to be of use. The frames, both half and full, are all based upon warre top bars that I already had cut.  It was a matter of making measurements and assembling them.  I had also seen a cool youtube video...

Gatineau Lift, What is that you say?

Over the July 4 Holiday weekend, my best friend (my wife) helped me assemble our modified Gatineau Hive lift (we call it the Guillotine).  Marc Gatineau a French warré beekeeper came up with this design.  Other bee hive lifts and info can be found on David’s Warré page Warre Hive Lift’s As the Warré hive is normally extended by nadiring boxes, i.e. inserting them under the growing brood nest, some heavy lifting can be avoided by making a mechanical lift according to one of the designs shown on this page. The originator of the Warré hive lift is Marc Gatineau (France) who used an action essentially the same as the guillotine formerly used for executions in France. More recent designs, though closely similar in principle, are less obviously guillotine-like. I set out with a few modifications in mind: Taller – To be able to lift possibly boxes 4, 5, or 6 only Wider – To be more multi hive capable Longer Support Legs – To be more multi hive capable Lockable winch – This way it can be locked while raising or lowering the hive(s) Pulley’s – Using pulleys allows a reduction in load and force needed By using 2-3 or more pulley’s a.k.a Block and Tackle, it reduces the load and the force needed to lift the hive boxes.  A given warré hive box could weigh 40-50lbs, 4 boxes could be nearly 200lbs.  My 3 pulley’s will make a 200lb hive reduce that in half, making it feel like it is only 100lb. http://www.warrebeekeeping.org/tmp/rdl.train.army.mil/catalog/view/100.ATSC/C63D46E7-488E-4D2D-AF13-F22E1D98AE5F-1311109164739/chap6.htm Which was originally hosted here: https://rdl.train.army.mil/catalog/view/100.ATSC/C63D46E7-488E-4D2D-AF13-F22E1D98AE5F-1311109164739/chap6.htm http://science.howstuffworks.com/transport/engines-equipment/pulley.htm Well it all came out great, although...

Abnormal to Humans, bee comb building

I typically let the bee’s do their own thing.  One thing that drives me crazy though, is when they build comb at odd angle’s.  It is how they want to build it.  It’s really not an issue, unless you want to do inspections, and then there will be no easy way to do it, without making a huge mess.  You will have to cut the comb/frame out, or do a whole box inspection/harvest.  Both hives built their first box, nearly perfect (for me) running cold frame.  The second box though, they had their own agenda as shown below. This first picture was when I first noticed the issue.  You see the frame on the left, was at about 45.  The next frame was at a 90.  The other 2 were fine.  As I saw this developing, I decided to put in top bars that had “Popsicle” sticks running down the middle.  When I did it to this hive, it set them back about a week.  They had to figure out what was going on, and start rebuilding the comb.  This picture is to show comb that was on my flat top bar’s.  The far right frame is straight.  But the next frames were not so much, and ended up being a nearly 90 across the top bars.   It makes it easy to see inside the individual cell’s and whats going on, but will be an issue for inspections.  Hopefully I won’t need to, and can harvest this box all at the same...

Uncapped brood, fresh eggs and development

I decided to amend this  entry and create a separate one, as I was able to get good video of some freshly layed egg’s and a few day old larvae. Here is the cycle about the bee’s: A worker bee is fed royal jelly until about 3 1/2 days old.  From day 3 1/2 until it is capped it is called open brood.  It is not capped until about day 8 (small cell).  From the day it is capped until it emerges is is called capped brood.  It emerges about day 18 – 19. After emergence for the first 2 days the worker will clean cells of hatched brood and generate heat for the brood next.  The next 3-5 days it will spend it’s life as a nurse bee, feeding the older larvae (open brood).  The next 6-10 days it will feed the young larvae.  Days 1-10 old it is considered a Nurse bee.  From day 11-18 the worker will make honey (not gathering) but ripen nectar and take it from the foraging bee’s and will build comb.  From days 19-21 the worker will be house bee.  Providing ventilation for the hive, guard bee, janitor and undertaker.  Day 22 until the end of their life, they become foragers.  Workers typically live about 6 weeks, working themselves to death until their wings become too shredded to fly anymore, or the hazard of foraging take’s their life.  But there is always bee’s being born (1000 – 3000) a day, and the cycle continues. We see some that are older, as the larvae are larger.  But we were also to see some...