FAQ - Fear NO Honey Bee

FAQ

Bee FAQ (3)

Typically there are a few ways to buy your bee’s. Packages, started packages or Nuc’s.
Packages – Come in various sizes, typically 2# or 3# and will include a queen and a feeder for their trip. They are made by shaking bee’s off of frames into a funnel down into a box with screen (package).

    -Pro’s – Package bee’s can be put into any type of hive, Top Bar, Lang, Warre etc… They include a young mated queen. Studies indicate that because there is no brood, this can break the mite cycle. They are easy to ship, and they are less expensive.
    -Con’s – Take longer to get established and get brood rearing and new foragers started. Need to be fed (sugar water, or known origin honey) to get started drawing comb. The bee’s themselves will all be from different hives and the queen may also be from yet a different hive. There is a chance they may abscond (leave the hive) if they do not like the hive box, or feel it is not a suitable home. There is a chance for chilled brood in early spring due to the weather. This may in turn slow things down considerably. There is also a chance that if you do not release the queen properly, that the bee’s may kill the queen.

Started Packages – Is special offering from us.  If you have heard that packages can be difficult, this option is for you.  We take a package like the above, and put them into a 5 frame box.    We take all the risk, of absconding, chilled brood, queen being accepted and queen laying.  You get bee’s that are ready to go, and nearly ready to hatch brood as well as pollen /nectar frames.  You get a 5 frame box that will have egg’s and brood at various stages and you take the whole box home.

    -Pro’s – We take all the risks that are involved (absconding, chilled brood & queen acceptance). We make sure the queen is accepted and is laying for you and that there are no issues. It allows the bee’s to draw out comb and foragers to bring back nectar and pollen.
    -Con’s – Takes 2 weeks longer than just getting a package before you take it home.

Nuc – (Nucleus) Typically come in 5 frames (sometimes 10 frames) of drawn comb of a laying queen, bee’s, brood, honey and pollen.

    -Pro’s – They are an established colony and allow for faster buildup. Less likely to absconding, starving than a package.
    -Con’s – Made for Lang hives, unless you want to cut and manipulate frames. Shipping cost’s significantly more and overall the cost of a Nuc is more expensive.
ShareShare on Facebook0Share on Google+0Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn0Pin on Pinterest0Share on Reddit0Email this to someone

Please log in to rate this.
1 person found this helpful.


The hive can be placed typically just about anywhere. It is amazing at how the bee’s can adapt. There are though some things to keep in mind.

  • Have the opening facing South to South East
  • The more sun exposure the better
  • Try to avoid low lying places where water could stand causing moisture issues
  • Suburban placement near a break (shrub, tree line, fence etc..) will get the bee’s up and over where people are
  • Urban placement on a rooftop, or patio of an apartment is fine
ShareShare on Facebook0Share on Google+0Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn0Pin on Pinterest0Share on Reddit0Email this to someone

Please log in to rate this.
1 person found this helpful.


At different times of the year you can feed different things.  The main thing to remember is Never, feed store bought honey.  Repeat that again to yourself.  Never ever feed store bought honey.  Why?  Because you do not know where it comes from.  Also store bought honey often contains HFCS (High Fructose Corn Syrup)  It’s content only has to be 10% of honey to be classified as honey.

If you need to feed you have a couple of options.  But ask yourself, why do you need to feed?  Is it emergency feed in the winter?  Spring buildup of new wax?  Did you harvest too much?  Can the bee’s do it on their own?

There can be many types of feed for bee’s.  I am only going to cover 2 of them.  Honey and Sugar.

Honey

Only feed your honey, or honey from a beekeeper that you know and trust that is free from disease and chemicals.  If you harvested too much honey, you can feed it back to them.  Just do it straight.  No need to dilute it down.  Adding water will make it more susceptible to fermenting.

Sugar

You can feed the bee’s sugar water.  I am not going to go into what ratio of water to sugar here, it’s up to you.  But we prefer it to be thick.  Typically in the range of 2:1 – 3:1  That means 2 parts sugar to 1 part water.  If you add some HBH (Honey Bee Healthy) they will be more likely to eat it.

Notes:  During the honey flow and other times, the bee’s prefer nectar.  Studies have show if you place 3 types of feed out, they will go to nectar first, then honey and lastly sugar.

ShareShare on Facebook0Share on Google+0Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn0Pin on Pinterest0Share on Reddit0Email this to someone

Please log in to rate this.
0 people found this helpful.


Equipment FAQ (4)

There are 3 sizes of standard Lang equipment. (I’ve listed them in order of how common) Most people use deep’s for hive body (brood) and mediums for honey supers (or shallow for honey supers)
9 5/8″ – Commonly called “Deep” – uses 9 1/8″ frames
6 5/8″ – Commonly called “Medium” or (Illinois) super – uses 6 1/4″ frames
5 3/4″ – Commonly called “Shallow” super – uses 5 3/8″ frames
There are some other sizes out there as well, but they are not as common.
You can get any of these in typically 10 or 8 frame widths. There are also 5 frame Nuc.

ShareShare on Facebook0Share on Google+0Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn0Pin on Pinterest0Share on Reddit0Email this to someone

Please log in to rate this.
1 person found this helpful.


When it comes to the frames themselves, there are only 2 basic types, Wood or Plastic.  Wood frames are the standard, Bee’s like them and so do we.

There are however various options for wood frames.

  • Groove Top Bar, Groove Bottom Bar – used for plastic foundation inserted – holes or no holes
  • Wedge Top Bar, Groove Bottom Bar – commonly used for wax foundation
  • Wedge Top Bar, Split Bottom Bar – used for wax foundation
ShareShare on Facebook0Share on Google+0Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn0Pin on Pinterest0Share on Reddit0Email this to someone

Please log in to rate this.
1 person found this helpful.


There are literally thousands of bee hive’s design’s out there.  I will list the most common ones.

Lang – aka Langstroth, aka Dadant most common in US

National – most common in UK

Top Bar – aka horizontal top bar hive

Warre – aka vertical top bar hive

ShareShare on Facebook0Share on Google+0Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn0Pin on Pinterest0Share on Reddit0Email this to someone

Please log in to rate this.
1 person found this helpful.


There are many places that you can purchase your equipment from.  Just realize some “kit’s” may contain things that you probably don’t need.  Before buying anything, we recommend you get with a bee keeper and ask questions.  There are really a few essentials that you need, and the rest may or may not be necessary.
Essential equipment

  • Hive tool
  • Smoker
  • Veil/jacket

 

If you are Local to Indianapolis we recommend:

Indy Bee Supply

 

Lebanon/Lafayette:

RJ Honey

 

Internet/Mail order places

Mann Lake LTD 

Dadant

Walter T Kelley Bee

Brushy Mountain

ShareShare on Facebook0Share on Google+0Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn0Pin on Pinterest0Share on Reddit0Email this to someone

Please log in to rate this.
1 person found this helpful.


faq (0)

Typically there are a few ways to buy your bee’s. Packages, started packages or Nuc’s.
Packages – Come in various sizes, typically 2# or 3# and will include a queen and a feeder for their trip. They are made by shaking bee’s off of frames into a funnel down into a box with screen (package).

    -Pro’s – Package bee’s can be put into any type of hive, Top Bar, Lang, Warre etc… They include a young mated queen. Studies indicate that because there is no brood, this can break the mite cycle. They are easy to ship, and they are less expensive.
    -Con’s – Take longer to get established and get brood rearing and new foragers started. Need to be fed (sugar water, or known origin honey) to get started drawing comb. The bee’s themselves will all be from different hives and the queen may also be from yet a different hive. There is a chance they may abscond (leave the hive) if they do not like the hive box, or feel it is not a suitable home. There is a chance for chilled brood in early spring due to the weather. This may in turn slow things down considerably. There is also a chance that if you do not release the queen properly, that the bee’s may kill the queen.

Started Packages – Is special offering from us.  If you have heard that packages can be difficult, this option is for you.  We take a package like the above, and put them into a 5 frame box.    We take all the risk, of absconding, chilled brood, queen being accepted and queen laying.  You get bee’s that are ready to go, and nearly ready to hatch brood as well as pollen /nectar frames.  You get a 5 frame box that will have egg’s and brood at various stages and you take the whole box home.

    -Pro’s – We take all the risks that are involved (absconding, chilled brood & queen acceptance). We make sure the queen is accepted and is laying for you and that there are no issues. It allows the bee’s to draw out comb and foragers to bring back nectar and pollen.
    -Con’s – Takes 2 weeks longer than just getting a package before you take it home.

Nuc – (Nucleus) Typically come in 5 frames (sometimes 10 frames) of drawn comb of a laying queen, bee’s, brood, honey and pollen.

    -Pro’s – They are an established colony and allow for faster buildup. Less likely to absconding, starving than a package.
    -Con’s – Made for Lang hives, unless you want to cut and manipulate frames. Shipping cost’s significantly more and overall the cost of a Nuc is more expensive.
ShareShare on Facebook0Share on Google+0Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn0Pin on Pinterest0Share on Reddit0Email this to someone

Please log in to rate this.
1 person found this helpful.


The hive can be placed typically just about anywhere. It is amazing at how the bee’s can adapt. There are though some things to keep in mind.

  • Have the opening facing South to South East
  • The more sun exposure the better
  • Try to avoid low lying places where water could stand causing moisture issues
  • Suburban placement near a break (shrub, tree line, fence etc..) will get the bee’s up and over where people are
  • Urban placement on a rooftop, or patio of an apartment is fine
ShareShare on Facebook0Share on Google+0Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn0Pin on Pinterest0Share on Reddit0Email this to someone

Please log in to rate this.
1 person found this helpful.


At different times of the year you can feed different things.  The main thing to remember is Never, feed store bought honey.  Repeat that again to yourself.  Never ever feed store bought honey.  Why?  Because you do not know where it comes from.  Also store bought honey often contains HFCS (High Fructose Corn Syrup)  It’s content only has to be 10% of honey to be classified as honey.

If you need to feed you have a couple of options.  But ask yourself, why do you need to feed?  Is it emergency feed in the winter?  Spring buildup of new wax?  Did you harvest too much?  Can the bee’s do it on their own?

There can be many types of feed for bee’s.  I am only going to cover 2 of them.  Honey and Sugar.

Honey

Only feed your honey, or honey from a beekeeper that you know and trust that is free from disease and chemicals.  If you harvested too much honey, you can feed it back to them.  Just do it straight.  No need to dilute it down.  Adding water will make it more susceptible to fermenting.

Sugar

You can feed the bee’s sugar water.  I am not going to go into what ratio of water to sugar here, it’s up to you.  But we prefer it to be thick.  Typically in the range of 2:1 – 3:1  That means 2 parts sugar to 1 part water.  If you add some HBH (Honey Bee Healthy) they will be more likely to eat it.

Notes:  During the honey flow and other times, the bee’s prefer nectar.  Studies have show if you place 3 types of feed out, they will go to nectar first, then honey and lastly sugar.

ShareShare on Facebook0Share on Google+0Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn0Pin on Pinterest0Share on Reddit0Email this to someone

Please log in to rate this.
0 people found this helpful.


ShareShare on Facebook0Share on Google+0Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn0Pin on Pinterest0Share on Reddit0Email this to someone