Fear NO Honey Bee - Organically managed gentle honey bees

Late Nov Bee’s still bringing in pollen

Ok, this is a quick update.  It’s late November 30 2014, and the honey bee’s are still bringing in pollen.  I am quite amazed, as we have had several days of hard freeze’s this month.  I’m not sure what would be producing some pollen this late in the year, but the girls found it and are bringing it in steadily.   This next picture was taken back on November 10, 2014.  You can see different shades of pollen.  From red, orange  and light...

Candy Board Installation

Here we are doing candy board installations. We did this November 11, 2014. The weather was changing quickly. We went from high’s in the 50°F’s (12°C) to high of 35°F (1°C) and low’s down to 8°F (-13°C). While we were doing the board installation, we also did a visual inspection. Basically checking the frames for honey, amount of bee’s, etc.. without removing the frames. I wanted the heat loss to be minimal and a little disruption to the bee’s at this point of the year as possible. The candy board frame it’s self has a 1/2″ hole drilled in one end. This allows for an upper entrance for the bee’s. It also allows for upper air flow thus reducing the amount of condensation inside the hive. As to the actual candy making process and recipe, see our article Making Hard Sugar Candy – Winter feeding...

Making Hard Sugar Candy – Winter feeding

Let’s talk about making hard sugar candy feeding your bee’s in winter. There are many way’s to do this and I will only cover a couple. I prefer to use the cold method, which does not entail boiling of sugar and water. It is your choice as to which recipe and method you follow and discussion of pro’s and con’s of each is not part of this. What we do know is that this does 2 things. The bee’s area and cluster is warm.  This warm air then hits cold outside air and causes a bit of condensation.  Bee’s also exhale which causes condensation.  This condensation forms on the lid and will drip back down on the bee’s then causing them to be chilled and possibly die. If the bee’s did not put up enough honey (or you harvested too much) then they could starve.  This provides emergency food for them to eat.  Some have noticed that even if they have honey stored, they take the sugar and eat it first possibly to allow the spring bee’s and brood to have access to natural honey. So these are the reasons I prefer to put the candy boards on.  I start with a frame that is the dimensions of your hive body.  Whether that is 8 frame, 10 frame, 5 frame nuc or even my Warre hive.  The sides can be 1.5″ (3.81cm) or larger.  I prefer about 1.75 – 2″. I am currently trying several recipes.  The first is a method that my club uses.  Which is Every 5# of sugar you need 6oz of water.  1tsp of HBH per...

Information about Oxalic Acid Vaporizers

I’ve had several contact me about using Oxalic Acid vaporizer. I’ve been reading all sorts of research about it. I’ll post external links below, but here is short summary: Oxalic acid is considered organic, as it is found naturally in various vegetables (spinach, rhubarb In EU it has been under deep study and they have been using it since 2003 (11 years now in my opinion is a good study time of it’s effects) Oxalic can already be found in the hive.  Studies have shown that using it to vaporize did not increase the before and after ppm of oxalic acid There are 2 methods of applying OA (oxalic acid) Drizzle – There needs to be no capped brood, and no nectar flow.  High concentrations can kill bee’s Vaporize – Does not harm bee’s, brood, larvae, queen, honey or wax.  I have yet to find anyone with information that there are downsides.  Yes you can burn a couple of bee’s if they touch the heating tray/element   Resources: http://scientificbeekeeping.com/oxalic-acid-heat-vaporization-and-other-methods-part-2-of-2-parts/ http://www.honeybeeworld.com/diary/articles/cor.htm http://www.dave-cushman.net/bee/oxalicthorne.html http://bickerstaffs-queens.blogspot.com/2008/08/oxalic-acid-vaporizer-oxalic-acid.html FearNoBee will be offering OA treatments to the small apiary, contact us today if you would like to talk more.  We will also be selling vaporizers at some point in the near future, contact us if you would like to order...

Don Fat Bee Man and I doing Oxalic Acid treatment

I was back down in GA working with Don the “Fat Bee Man”. We did vaporized Oxalic acid treatments to the hives. It is easy to do maybe 5 minutes total per hive. Oxalic acid research. I had not done much research into oxalic acid before. But doing lot’s of reading it is a naturally occurring element found in spinach, rubarb plants and can already be found in the hive. Oxalic acid is not legally approved for mite control in the U.S. The author does not promote its use as such in any unapproved manner. But the EU has approved this and has been doing it for many years without harmful...

We still have honey bee queen for sale

We still have honey bee queens for sale. We are local to Indianapolis, Indiana if you would like to pick them up. Otherwise we can ship them to you. Many people prefer to re-queen their hives in the late summer/ early fall time. Whether it is due to genetics, or a struggling weak hive. Because of this we continuously have queen’s being hatched and mated. There are also articles that state a queen raised after the summer equinox, that the following year the queen will still be considered a year old queen. This gives you the ability of producing your fall/winter bee’s and still have a good strong laying queen for the following year(s). But we will be slowing down soon, when the hives start kicking out drone’s due to lack of resources. Some beekeepers (even south of us) are already seeing their hives kicking the boy’s to the curb. However, we are still doing fine, and still have plenty of drone’s for proper mating. We will probably have one more batch of queens available until about mid September, after that it is all dependent on the weather. When you buy a queen from us, they are laying queens (not virgin) and we check that prior to putting her in a cage. Our queens are raised natural queen cell’s by the bee’s themselves. Studies have shown this produces a better queen than what a person could ever graft. We will put 6-8 attendants in with her (seven are required for USPS shipping insurance). Queens cost $35.00 ea, shipping...

Limited amount of Raw Cut comb honey

Fearnobee has a limited amount of raw cut comb honey available.  This is raw, unfiltered honey comb in it’s most natural state.  There are many benefits of eating and using cut comb honey.  As bee’s bring back pollen from flowers, traces of that fall’s off their body and can be immersed in the wax and honey.  Many allergy sufferers can find this will help them relieve their symptoms. Our bee’s are encouraged to draw their own wax.  We do not use ANY foundation in the frames (commercial nor organic).  Thus it is all natural ingredients that goes into the making of the honey comb.  You may also see some “wavy” pieces of cut comb.  We let the bee’s make it and fill it the way they wanted versus forcing them to build it based upon perception.  Although some people complain about the wax sticking to their teeth/mouth.  If you spread it on a warm piece of toast or bagel or warm cereal you will find that it is less likely to get stuck. We harvest limited amounts in this style, although we love to eat it ourselves.  This harvest ran from May – August 1.  The nectar (honey) that it contains varies greatly.  From wild flowers (clover(s) including white, yellow and dutch, sunflower, echinacea, mint, strawberry, alfalfa), gardens (pumpkin, cucumber, watermelon) and tree’s (locust, basswood, catalpa)  Thus it has a varied taste to it.  Mostly light, very naturally sweet, with a hint of...